Modernism


“If we believe Porphyry when he tells us that his master was born in the thirteenth year of the reign of Severus, that he listened to Ammonius at Alexandria, that he came to Rome at the age of forty, that he died in the Campagna; if we believe him when he tells us of his rules of health and his way of living, his kindness towards orphans entrusted to his care, his way of teaching, of composing works, of pronouncing Greek, of arranging his spelling, and the rest, why should we not believe him when he tells us that the philosopher was inspired by a higher daemon who dwelt within him and who showed himself upon his death in sensible guise? ‘At that moment, a serpent glided under the bed upon which he was reclining and slid into a whole in the wall; and Plotinus gave up his soul.’ Indeed, it would be surprising if the metaphysical eros, wherever Christ does not dwell, did not call for some kind of collusion with superhuman intellectual natures, the rectores hujus mundi.”

“You are made void of Christ, you who are justified in the law: you are fallen from grace.”

– Galatians 5:4

“For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not in wisdom of speech, lest the cross of Christ should be made void.”

– 1 Corinthians 1:17

“Lest too great a variety of religious orders leads to grave confusion in God’s church, we strictly forbid anyone henceforth to found a new religious order. Whoever wants to become a religious should enter one of the already approved orders. Likewise, whoever wishes to found a new religious house should take the rule and institutes from already approved religious orders.”

 – Lateran IV (1215)

“…the disgrace into which the Society of Jesus had fallen made Catholics hesitant to embrace doctrines with which the Jesuits had been identified. One such doctrine was that for those who were inculpably ignorant of the Christian message, or of its truth, explicit Christian faith was not strictly necessary for salvation. Jesuits had taught that such people could be saved, as those who lived before the coming of Christ could be, by a faith in Christ, or a desire of such faith, that would be implicit in their faith in God. As we have seen, this was a departure from the teaching of St Thomas and the whole mediaeval tradition, which had required explicit Christian faith for the salvation of everyone in the Christian era. After the suppression of the Jesuit order, hardly any Catholic theologians dared to question the traditional teaching on this point.”

– Francis Sullivan S.J.

I confess that all men from Adam, even to the consummation of the world, having been born and having died with Adam himself and his wife, who were not born of other parents, but were created, the one from the earth, the other, however, from the rib of the man [cf. Gen 2:7], will then rise again and stand before the Judgment seat of Christ, that every one may receive the proper things of the body, according as he has done, whether it be good or bad [Rom 14:10, 2Cor 5:10]; and indeed by the very bountiful grace of God he will present the just, as vessels of mercy prepared beforehand for glory [Rom 9:23], with the rewards of eternal life; namely, they will live without end in the society of the angels without any fear now of their own fall; the wicked, however, remaining by choice of their own with vessels of wrath fit for destruction [Rom 9:22], who either did not know the way of the Lord, or knowing it left it when seized by various transgressions, He will give over by a very just judgment to the punishment of eternal and inextinguishable fire, that they may burn without end. This, then, is my faith and hope, which is in me by the gift of the mercy of God, in defence of which blessed Peter taught [cf. 1 Peter 3:15] that we ought to be especially ready to answer everyone who asks us for an accounting. 

– Pope Pelagius I, Humani Generis, 557 [D228a/DH443]

Peters goes for Bellarmine’s view over that of Suarez and Cajetan: “Through heresy notoriously and openly expressed, the Roman Pontiff, should he fall into such, is, by that very fact, and before any declaratory sentence of the Church, deprived of his power of jurisdiction.” However, it seems to me, there is effectively no practical difference as to be heresy the error has to be obstinate and and so the admonition of the Pope’s proper counsellors has the same effect as the declaratory sentence by the same. Peters doesn’t reach this point because he eschews “detailed canonical examination of the mechanics for assessing possible papal heresy”.

https://canonlawblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/16/a-canonical-primer-on-popes-and-heresy/

boniface7

If the Pope, being neglectful of his own salvation and that of his brethren, be found useless and remiss in his works, and, more than that, reluctant to do good (which harms himself and others even more), and nonetheless brings down with him innumerable throngs of people … Let no mortal man presume to rebuke him for his faults, for, it being incumbent upon him to judge all, he should be judged by no one, unless he is suddenly caught deviating from the faith…

– Decretum Gratiani, Si Papa, dist 40, ch 6 (attributed to Saint Boniface)

http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/fetzen-fliegen/item/2917-can-the-church-judge-a-heretical-pope

 

Supernatural is a dangerous and difficult word in any of its senses, looser or stricter. But to fairies it can hardly be applied, unless super is taken merely as a superlative prefix. For it is man who is, in contrast to fairies, supernatural (and often of diminutive stature); whereas they are natural, far more natural than he. Such is their doom.

– J.R.R. Tolkien, Essay on Fairy Stories (1947)

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