Regnum Britanniarum


…for, even as Christ, in whose throne I sit in this part of the earth, is the husband to the church and the church his spouse, so I likewise desire to be your husband, and you should be my spouse; and, therefore, as it is the husband’s part to cherish his wife, to entreat her kindly, to reconcile himself towards her, and procure her love by all means, so it is my part to do the like to my people.

James I, Address to Parliament on 19th February 1623

Tomorrow is the 100th anniversary of the bloodiest day in British military history. I wonder how many of the young men who went over the top on the Somme that Saturday morning in July knew that it was the Feast of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus Christ. Too few: but those who gave their lives or limbs for Christian civilisation, however poorly understood, made a sacrifice which He surely did not spurn. If there are any souls of those who died on either side in that battle still in purgatory, may they rest at last in peace.

A week ago the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of those who fought on the Somme, and at Mons and Passchendaele voted. They voted to resist an anti-Christian empire that wishes to rule them. The vote was close, but it was clear. It may be that if five more years had gone by, the changing of the generations would have caused the vote to be different. But the vote was not taken in five years time, it was taken in the year of grace 2016.

Now we hear voices saying that the people must be made to vote again, till they get it right. How can the poor and the uneducated be expected to know what is best for them? A feature in the Guardian yesterday solemnly warns us that elections can be the enemy of democracy. Here at Laodicea we have supported suffrage by household rather than by individual; but given that the youth vote was in favour of ‘Remain’, and given that a larger proportion of such voters than of older ones are living in another’s household, then the margin of victory would have been even larger on Laodicean principles.

In any case, the vote has been taken, and has shown an impressive popular will to resist the propaganda and the vested interests of the godless rich, and the sense of having a heritage to defend. Of course the country cannot be healed by such a will or such a sense, without first turning back to the Precious Blood. But this is, at least, a chink in the darkness, a first unmerited grace (gratia operans) given to Britain. May the descendants of the heroes of the Somme be not unworthy of their sires.

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The nations, not so blest as thee,

Must, in their turns, to tyrants fall;

While thou shalt flourish great and free,

The dread and envy of them all.

Rule, Britannia! rule the waves:

Britons never will be slaves.

minimum-wage-poverty

An excellent article from the Guardian Money editor on why he is voting Leave. The arguments of the Remain side that Brexit will hit the poor are based on the bogus claim that Brexit will trigger a recession. What they ignore is that unlimited cheap labour destroys the need of low pay employers to compete for workers by offering more than the minimum wage. Furthermore, the Common Agricultural Policy and the Common External Tariff artificially inflate food prices taking a huge chunk out of the budget of the poorest. VAT on household fuel bills cannot be abolished inside the EU.

NO REFORM FROM WITHIN

British voters have to know there will be no kind of any negotiation. We have concluded a deal with the prime minister. He got the maximum he could receive, and we gave the maximum we could give, so there will be no kind of renegotiation.

– EU Commission President Jean Claude Juncker

TURKISH ACCESSION TALKS BEGIN AS SOON AS REFERENDUM OUT OF THE WAY

The EU will open new membership talks with Turkey as planned in a few days

– EU source who asked not to be named

NO EU TARIFFS FOR UK AFTER BREXIT

“Imposing trade barriers, imposing protectionist measures between our two countries – or between the two political centres, the European Union on the one hand and the UK on the other – would be a very, very foolish thing in the 21st century. The BDI would urge politicians on both sides to come up with a trade regime that enables us to uphold and maintain the levels of trade we have”

Markus Kerber head of the BDI (German CBI)

IF WE REMAIN WE WILL JOIN THE EURO

 

There will come a time when Britain will join [the Euro].

– Lord Heseltine

 

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